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Optical Illusion graphics – 2015

October 4, 2015

This autumn is big and bold with colour, patterns and shape.It sees the return of the 80s and unofficially you could also call this the return of the 60s. After all, we’re seeing the return of optical illusion graphics on dresses, tops and skirts, and it’s not far removed to what was around in the 1960s.

Optical Illusion graphics – 2015 and the 60s & 70s

Optical illusion graphic prints were around in the 1960s and the 1970s, and it was an artistic movement that moved into mainstream fashion – after all, art and fashion have always danced around each other over the years.

 

Optical Illusion graphics was an art form that used lines, shapes and space to create optical illusions, giving depth, vibrations and a clever illusion of movement.In Time magazine in the mid-60s the term op art was coined to describe the effect of creating illusions, it was also named retinal art.

 

This new art form had its inspiration in Futurism of the 20s, Dadaism and cubism.

Cultural and political change

The 60s was a decade that underwent radical change with the assassination of President Kennedy in 1963, and then the assignation of Martin Luther King in 1968. Feminism and gay rights also rose to political prominence with a fight for liberation and equal pay.

 

Artists such as Victory Vasarely and Bridget Riley became well known for their Optical Illusion graphics art work and their work reflected the changes in this era.

 

With designers such as Mary Quant and Ossie Clark, optical Optical Illusion graphics art went from the frame to fashion, with jackets, skirts and dresses wearing the new optical illusion patterns.

 

The cultural and political changes of the 60s and early 70s had a profound effect on fashion and Optical Illusion graphics art became a big part of that.

And now it’s back…..

Contemporary and vintage optical illusion graphics

So how do you wear the new optical illusion graphics then?

Well, you can always buy vintage and mix it with contemporary pieces. Block colours in a shade that reflects the patterns in the dress, top or skirt is a good idea for a strikingly bold look.

 

This autumn monochrome checks and zigzag prints are good with cubes, diamonds and swirls.Again these can be mixed and matched with plain block colours and carefully picking a colour that matches those in the print.

The 60s trend on the catwalk

This is a great trend for those that love the 60s and they don’t always have to be bright either, they can be in autumnal colours too.

 

There were some great vivid Optical Illusion graphic patterns on the catwalk for this autumn with Dior, Pucci, Loewe and many more embracing the trend.

Vintage or contemporary – it’s a bold move

Whether you go with a vintage print or a more contemporary one (and naturally you’ll prefer vintage!), you’ll want it one of two ways.You’ll either go for the all over bold graphic look, or you’ll choose one or two Optical Illusion graphic prints and break it up with more solid colours.

 

It’s entirely up to you – it’s a bold and clever way of dressing and you can create your very own Optical Illusion graphics illusions.

 

 

Optical Illusion graphics for autumn and winter
Optical Illusion art
Illusory pictures that challenged what you saw
Graphic optical prints for Autumn and winter
Mary Quant embraced monochrome optical graphics
Emilio Pucci – famous for his psychedelic prints
Graphic illusion graphics
Balmain, Bottega Veneta, Dries van Noten

 

 

 

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